TEACHING IN WORSHIP (1 TIMOTHY 1:2-11)

In this series we will study Paul’s 1st letter to Timothy, who was pastoring the church in the city of Ephesus. We will specifically key in on applications and lessons that apply to worship ministry and worship leaders. Today we will look at our calling as worship leaders.

“To Timothy my true son in the faith:

Grace, mercy and peace from God the Father and Christ Jesus our Lord.

As I urged you when I went into Macedonia, stay there in Ephesus so that you may command certain people not to teach false doctrines any longer or to devote themselves to myths and endless genealogies. Such things promote controversial speculations rather than advancing God’s work—which is by faith. The goal of this command is love, which comes from a pure heart and a good conscience and a sincere faith. Some have departed from these and have turned to meaningless talk. They want to be teachers of the law, but they do not know what they are talking about or what they so confidently affirm.

We know that the law is good if one uses it properly. We also know that the law is made not for the righteous but for lawbreakers and rebels, the ungodly and sinful, the unholy and irreligious, for those who kill their fathers or mothers, for murderers, for the sexually immoral, for those practicing homosexuality, for slave traders and liars and perjurers—and for whatever else is contrary to the sound doctrine that conforms to the gospel concerning the glory of the blessed God, which he entrusted to me.”

1 Timothy

ARE WE TEACHERS?

Recently a friend of mine asked me if worship songs were supposed to teach people things. Without hesitation I shot back “well, we’re fooling ourselves if we think they aren’t.”

The truth is that most of us don’t remember what was taught in the sermon 3 weeks or 3 years ago, but we remember the songs. Timothy was charged not only to refute false teaching, but to instruct the people with sound teaching. I believe my pastor does this each week from the pulpit, and as worship leader, part of my job is to assist and support that teaching with songs that are based on sound doctrine.

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By The Commandment of God

In this series we will study Paul’s 1st letter to Timothy, who was pastoring the church in the city of Ephesus. We will specifically key in on applications and lessons that apply to worship ministry and worship leaders. Today we will look at our calling as worship leaders.

“PAUL, AN APOSTLE OF CHRIST JESUS ACCORDING TO THE COMMANDMENT OF GOD OUR SAVIOR, AND OF CHRIST JESUS,WHO IS OUR HOPE”

1 Timothy 1:1

Paul was writing to Timothy, who he had sent to pastor and lead the church in Ephesus. What’s interesting in this verse is that recognizes his calling. For him it was being apostle, for us it’s to lead the church in song worship.

Whatever you do, whoever you are, God has specific callings on our lives. Mine is to be primarily a pastor/teacher and worship leader. By the grace of God I am what I am (1 Co 15:10), and I stand in that grace and calling.

Even if you are an “Accidental Worship Leader” or you’re in a season where you feel like you’re on the bench, God has a calling for you.

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What If?: Speaking In Tongues

What If? This series looks at real world situations that come up in worship leading. They may not happen often, but they happen often enough to talk about and plan ahead for. This week we’ll talk about speaking in tongues in a church service.

IT CAN HAPPEN TO YOU

Someone might have read the above paragraph and said “what’s the big deal?” If you come from certain charismatic traditions you might not find this blog post applicable. In your church this may be a very common occurrence, but for a majority of churches, even churches like mine that believe and embrace the gifts of the Spirit as valid for today, someone speaking in another tongue during a worship service isn’t the norm.

Someone else might have just read the above paragraph and said “not at my church!”. Says who? This is the “what if” series, so play along with me here. Let’s say you lead worship at a baptist or reformed church that holds to a Cessationist viewpoint, and after your third song, a person you’ve never seen before begins to cry out in a language you don’t understand. “We don’t do that at my church” you might say, and sure, that may be the accepted procedure. But let’s say that this person walked into your church not knowing that, and for whatever reason decided to speak out in this way, what do you do?

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The Next Worship Leaders

Editor’s Note: This post while written by me, originally appeared over at the Worship Links blog, so check them out.

Eight thoughts on bringing the next generation into your worship community.

1. IT’S NOT AN OPTION

The church has two main callings: 1. To preach the gospel 2. To make disciples. The discipleship process isn’t all spiritual, it’s also practical. Paul, Peter, Barnabas, and other major players in the early church always travelled with young men, letting them learn in a practical, hands on setting how to fulfill the ministry that was given to them (1 Timothy 4:14). The same is true for those of us who minister in music. I’m always looking for my replacement. Who’s the young man or woman that God is raising up in my church? Discipleship is not optional for the christian, neither is making disciples. As worship leaders, music directors, and worship pastors, we need to have our eyes, ears, and hearts open to see who will lead the next generation in praise and worship of our King.

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When Is It Time For A Song To Die?

I’ve heard and read a lot lately on how to introduce a new song, but the Worship Links blog posted a link to Jon Nicol’s thoughts on the Lifecyle of a song, or better yet, how to put a song out of our misery.

RECOGNIZE THAT SEASONS EXIST

“To everything there is a season” the Bible tells us. This is also true for worship songs, although not everyone seems to have read Ecclesiastes 3:1.

They say the first step is admitting you have a problem. If you don’t recognize that every song has a season, then you won’t be aware and watching for when that season has it’s end. This doesn’t mean that every song you’d played last Sunday is out of date. But out of the songs you did lead, some where at the start of their life cycle, some where in an undefined middle, and some were quite possibly past their prime.

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Playing For The Prodigal

I’m not sure how helpful this post will be. It’s not even something that I do intentionally anymore. But maybe, somewhere out there, this will help someone out.

Every church has prodigals; people who once professed Christ and dwelled with us in community but who are now wandering, rebellious, and living wild in the world. Several years ago I was leading worship at a church where I did not have a long history, but almost weekly I would hear someone mention a prodigal son or daughter of the church who had “popped in” out of nowhere. Some of them stayed, some of them did not. After a while I realized two things. First, for whatever reason, in that season of the church’s life there was a returning generation of those who had wandered. I didn’t know why or how long it had been happening or it would last, only that it was going on. The second thing I realized is that not every prodigal was being recognized. If this many were being noticed (and hopefully embraced and ministered to) how many more were slipping in and out (it was a fairly large church).

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Q&A

Every so often I like to look over the Google searches that bring people to this blog. It’s interesting what people look for, and what brings them my way. There are a few great questions, and a few ridiculous questions. What questions are people who stumble upon this blog asking? Let’s find out.

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